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Monday, July 13, 2020 | History

3 edition of Are resources a curse? found in the catalog.

Are resources a curse?

Andrea Gawrich

Are resources a curse?

rentierism and energy policy in post-Soviet states

by Andrea Gawrich

  • 279 Want to read
  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Barbara Budrich in Opladen, Farmington Hills, MI .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Economic policy,
  • Political corruption,
  • Energy policy,
  • Economic conditions,
  • Resource curse

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical resources.

    StatementAndrea Gawrich, Anja Franke, Jana Windwehr, eds
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHD9502.F672 A74 2011
    The Physical Object
    Pagination213 p. :
    Number of Pages213
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25033881M
    ISBN 103866493401
    ISBN 109783866493407
    LC Control Number2011286249
    OCLC/WorldCa650217431

      Escaping the Resource Curse lays out a path for radically improving the management of the world's natural resources. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required/5(5). The resource curse is the theory that countries with an abundance of natural resources, such as oil and minerals, achieve less economic growth than countries that are not endowed with natural resources. There are authors that argue this point (Auty , Gelb , Sachs and Warner , , ) and there are those that believe the resource.

    The study evaluated the resource-curse hypothesis in N countries for the period – • We use second-generation econometric techniques for estimations. • The study verified that N countries are resource-curse victims. • Human capital and technological innovation .   But historically, those resources have often been more of a curse than a blessing. There are numerous examples of African nations where the discovery of .

      A while ago we discussed the economic and political dimensions of the resource curse (see here, here, here, here and here).We did not end on a happy note. The evidence suggests that countries with bad institutions are likely to experience the natural resource curse.   Daniel Lederman and William Maloney, for instance, have suggested that natural resources are neither curse nor destiny, asserting instead that it's a mixed bag: some resource .


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Are resources a curse? by Andrea Gawrich Download PDF EPUB FB2

In the last quarter century, we have seen the surprising and sobering consequences of this wealth, producing what is now known as the "resource curse." Countries with large endowments of natural resources, such as oil and gas, often do worse than their poorer neighbors. In the last quarter century, we have seen the surprising and sobering consequences of this wealth, producing what is now known as the resource curse.

Countries with large endowments of natural resources, such as oil and gas, often do worse than their/5. The “resource curse,” or “paradox of plenty,” refers to the long-established notion central in development economics that countries rich in natural resources, particularly minerals and fuels, perform less well economically than countries with fewer natural resources.

In other words, resources are an economic curse rather than a blessing. This phenomenon, known as the resource curse, is a core challenge for energy-exporting states. Beyond the Resource Curse focuses on this relationship between natural wealth and economic security, discussing the particular pitfalls and consistent perils facing oil- and gas-exporting states.

In the last quarter century, we have seen the surprising and sobering consequences of this wealth, producing what is now known as the "resource curse." Countries with large endowments of natural resources, such as oil and gas, often do worse than their poorer neighbors.

The resource curse, also known as the paradox of plenty, refers to the paradox that countries with an abundance of natural resources (such as fossil fuels and certain minerals), tend to have less economic growth, less democracy, and worse development outcomes than countries with fewer natural resources.

What Is the Resource Curse. The resource curse, or resource trap, is a paradoxical situation in which countries with an abundance of non-renewable natural resources experience stagnant economic.

The Resource Curse describes a situation where a country with abundant natural resources such as oil, diamonds, or gold, is worse off economically and politically, compared to countries with fewer natural resources. Nigeria is rich in oil, but has failed to become more economically and politically advanced.

Causes Of The Resource Curse Corruption: Corruption is one of the key causes of a resource curse. the process of mining and extraction of the natural resources is bedeviled with corruption right from the point of discovery of the resources to extraction and sale of the products.

used to illustrate the concept of resource curse in Africa. However, to focus on the ‘resource curse’ – to emphasize that the presence of natural resources in an African county leads to the degeneration of its economic, social, and political institutions - is to miss the point.

The Oil Curse is essential reading for scholars and those engaged in public debates. An important contribution."—Robert Bates, Harvard University "This is the single most important book on the resource curse to date. The Oil Curse addresses a timely, policy-relevant issue in a way that nonacademics and academic specialists alike can.

What is the resource curse. The 'resource curse' or 'Dutch disease' tries to explain why countries that are richer in natural resources are poorer, have less economic growth and are less democratic.¹ Its a paradox of economics - surely the countries and societies with the most valuable resources should be.

The 'resource curse' is the view that countries with extensive natural resources tend to suffer from a host of undesirable outcomes, including the weakening of state capacity, authoritarianism.

• The term resource curse encompasses the significant social, economic and political challenges that are unique to countries rich in oil, gas and minerals. • Many oil- gas- and mineral-rich countries have failed to reach their full potential as a result of their natural resource wealth.

In general, they are also more authoritarian. This book provides compelling evidence that one of the core assumptions of the conventional literature on the resource curse – namely that ownership structure does not vary and thus cannot hold any explanatory power – is not only unfounded but also has impeded our understanding of the relationship between mineral wealth and institutions.

The Natural Resource Curse: A Survey Jeffrey A. Frankel. NBER Working Paper No. Issued in March NBER Program(s):Environment and Energy Economics, International Finance and Macroeconomics It is striking how often countries with oil or other natural resource wealth have failed to grow more rapidly than those by:   Among the many frustrations in development, perhaps none looms larger than the "resource curse." Perversely, the worst development outcomes--measured in poverty, inequality, and deprivation--are.

“Resource Curse or Cure. is an excellent addition to the body of critical work on the Australian resource sector. A non-specialist in the Australian mining industry would find the book a great introduction to the key issues, while a veteran scholar on the industry would find a useful synthesis, an update and a repository of new data.” (Franklin Obeng-Odoom, Economic Record, Vol.

91 (   The question of how natural resources affect economic development is an important and intriguing field of economic research. Although the early resource curse literature documented a strong. The Background. The British economist Richard Auty coined the term “resource curse” in a book investigating why resource-rich countries under-performed other developing economies.

A. Resource curse? governmentality, oil and power in the Niger Delta, Nigeria Citations Metrics; Reprints & Permissions; PDF Abstract. What might it mean to say that resources, and resource-dependency, have consequences for the conduct of politics?

This article explores the research conducted under the sign of resource politics associated with the. Fiscal Policy and the Natural Resources Curse re-examines this ancient, unsolved puzzle, asking why many governments of natural resource-intensive countries are incapable, in a globalised world, of dealing with the natural-resource curse.

This book offers a detailed analysis of the power-relationships which underpin the natural resource curse. Judith Brett traces the unusual history of Australia’s economy and the “resource curse” that has shaped our politics. She shows how the mining industry learnt to run fear campaigns, and how the Coalition became dominated by fossil-fuel interests to the exclusion of other voices.